13 Dec 2017
November 26, 2013 - Filed under: History of Antiques — David

According to a recent report by the Courier Post, during 2013 – the 50th year since the assassination of US president John F. Kennedy – the demand for JFK memorabilia continues to increase.

The leather bomber jacket worn by JFK was recently sold at auction for $570,000(£351,500).

Although the president died on 22nd November 1963, he remains a part of presidential history, with collectors still eager to purchase items at auction or from dealers. According to the owner of an online store which deals in presidential memorabilia, John F. Kennedy was the number one president, with Ronald Reagan taking second place and Abe Lincoln in third.

Antiques stores have memorabilia from that period – including campaign posters, political buttons and commemorative coins. The Courier Post reported that owners of specialist sites have sold items of JFK memorabilia, stating that the demand and value of the items depend largely on authenticity.

JFK autographs can cause a problem for collectors, as the president often used variations of his signature. Frequently, his secretary or an auto-pen machine would have signed his name. Livingston and Ferber both say that it can be difficult to determine how relevant an item is to the president.

Items which are sold may also be considered macabre. The original coffin of Oswald was sold three years earlier at auction for $87,000, by a funeral home in Texas that was involved when his body was exhumed in 1981.

Many collectors buy items to be displayed in their homes, like art or antique furniture to be enjoyed by all. People who collect memorabilia may find an antique chest in Lancashire to display to other interested parties.

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